Brain

The following list provides a brief description of brain cancer trials that are open for recruitment in Western Australia. If you would like more information please follow the links provided, contact one of the trial sites or speak with your doctor.

Please note that this list is based on information provided to the Cancer Council by WA hospitals and may not include all clinical trials that are running in WA.

Where ‘N/A' appears - this means the lacking information has not been provided to date to the Cancer Council.

 

TTAC

Registered Title

A Multicenter, 3-Arm, Open-Label, Phase ?a Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of TTAC-0001, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

Purpose  N/A
Lay Summary  N/A
WA Trial Sites

Breast Clinical Trials Unit Ph. (08) 6500 5555

Links  US National Library of Medicine

Acknowledgements: US National Library of Medicine

 

18S-MC-JUAB

Registered Title A Phase 1 Study of an ERK1/2 Inhibitor (LY3214996) Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Advanced Cancer
Purpose  The purpose of this study is to determine the safety of an extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor LY3214996 administered alone or in combination with other agents in participants with advanced cancer.
Lay Summary  N/A
WA Trial Sites

Linear clinical research
08 9346 3823

Links US National Library of Medicine

Acknowledgements: US National Library of Medicine

 

ROAM TROG 15.02

Registered title  Radiation versus Observation following surgical resection of Atypical Meningioma: a randomised controlled trial
Purpose  Meningiomas are a type of brain tumour that start in the linings (membranes) of the brain. Most of these tumours are benign (not cancerous) and can be treated with surgery. Very rarely, they are malignant (cancerous) and need treatment with both surgery and radiotherapy.
Lay Summary

Meningiomas are a type of brain tumour that start in the linings (membranes) of the brain. Most of these tumours are benign (not cancerous) and can be treated with surgery. Very rarely, they are malignant (cancerous) and need treatment with both surgery and radiotherapy.

Although benign meningiomas are slow growing, others can grow more quickly and have a higher chance of coming back. These are called atypical meningiomas. Doctors think that giving radiotherapy after surgery might stop them growing again. But they aren't sure, so want to find out more.

In this trial, some people have radiotherapy after surgery and some don't. Instead, they have regular check ups to see how they are getting on. This is called active monitoring.

The aims of the trial are to:

  • find out if radiotherapy stops atypical mengiomas coming back
  • learn more about the side effects of radiotherapy
  • find out more about the cost of radiotherapy compared to active monitoring
WA Trial Sites

SCGH - Radiation Oncology (08) 6383 3204

Links

Cancer Research UK

 

 

 

[Return to List of Clinical Trials]