Brain

The following list provides a brief description of brain cancer trials that are open for recruitment in Western Australia. If you would like more information please follow the links provided, contact one of the trial sites or speak with your doctor.

Please note that this list is based on information provided to the Cancer Council by WA hospitals and may not include all clinical trials that are running in WA.

Where ‘N/A' appears - this means the lacking information has not been provided to date to the Cancer Council.

 

The ACED Trial

Registered Title

A Phase II randomised placebo-controlled, double blind, multisite study of Acetazolamide versus placebo for management of cerebral oedema in recurrent and/or progressive High Grade Glioma requiring treatment with Dexamethasone – The ACED trial.

Purpose

This study investigates whether addition of the drug acetazolamide to a dexamethasone treatment for controlling raised intracranial pressure symptoms, related to high grade glioma brain tumour (such as headache, nausea and vomiting), will allow the dexamethasone dosage to be reduced, and whether this leads to less dexamethasone-related side-effects.

Lay Summary

Who is it for?

You can join this study if you are required to restart or increase a dexamethasone treatment to control recurrent or increased symptoms of intracranial pressure, that may be related to your brain tumour, high grade glioma.

Study details:

If you like to join this study you will first be screened by your specialist to see if you meet the eligibility criteria to participate in this study. If you are deemed eligible to participate you will be randomly (by chance) assigned to one of two possible treatment groups: Group 1 will receive 1 tablet of 250mg acetazolamide twice per day for 8 weeks, in addition to the dexamethasone treatment. Group 2 will receive 1 tablet of placebo twice per day for 8 weeks, in addition to the dexamethasone treatment. Your chance to receive the group 1 treatment is equally high as to receive the group 2 treatment. You cannot choose to which group you are assigned and both you and your doctor will not know which treatment you received until the study is finished.

Participants will be asked to attend clinic visits every 2 weeks during the treatment period and then 1 more time (about 1 month after having received the last treatment). During these visits the specialist will assess your physical and mental health, and ask you about your well-being. Participants will also be asked to undergo tests and procedures, such as blood testing, scans, and questionnaire completion.

WA Trial Sites

Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Logo

SCGH Medical Oncology
Ph. (08) 6383 3000

Links

Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry

Acknowledgements: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry

 

CheckMate 548 Glioblastoma Study

Registered Title

A Randomized Phase 2 Single Blind Study of Temozolomide Plus Radiation Therapy Combined With Nivolumab or Placebo in Newly Diagnosed Adult Subjects With MGMT-Methylated (Tumor O6-methylguanine DNA Methyltransferase) Glioblastoma.

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate patients with glioblastoma that is MGMT-methylated (the MGMT gene is altered by a chemical change). Patients will receive temozolomide plus radiation therapy. They will be compared to patients receiving Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide plus radiation therapy.

Lay Summary

N/A

WA Trial Sites

Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Logo

SCGH Medical Oncology
Ph. (08) 6383 3000

Links

US National Library of Medicine

Acknowledgements: US National Library of Medicine


ROAM TROG 15.02

Registered title  Radiation versus Observation following surgical resection of Atypical Meningioma: a randomised controlled trial
Purpose  Meningiomas are a type of brain tumour that start in the linings (membranes) of the brain. Most of these tumours are benign (not cancerous) and can be treated with surgery. Very rarely, they are malignant (cancerous) and need treatment with both surgery and radiotherapy.
Lay Summary

Meningiomas are a type of brain tumour that start in the linings (membranes) of the brain. Most of these tumours are benign (not cancerous) and can be treated with surgery. Very rarely, they are malignant (cancerous) and need treatment with both surgery and radiotherapy.

Although benign meningiomas are slow growing, others can grow more quickly and have a higher chance of coming back. These are called atypical meningiomas. Doctors think that giving radiotherapy after surgery might stop them growing again. But they aren't sure, so want to find out more.

In this trial, some people have radiotherapy after surgery and some don't. Instead, they have regular check ups to see how they are getting on. This is called active monitoring.

The aims of the trial are to:

  • find out if radiotherapy stops atypical mengiomas coming back
  • learn more about the side effects of radiotherapy
  • find out more about the cost of radiotherapy compared to active monitoring
WA Trial Sites

SCGH - Radiation Oncology (08) 6383 3204

Links

Cancer Research UK

 

 

 

[Return to List of Clinical Trials]